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? fewer still want to be loved with all the deficit. lou: it's going to have to mean cutting the federal budget.the x >> even if we increase the taxr, rates, as you noted, the top 1%y in this country, 17% of the 37 income is what they make. they pay 7% 37% of the taxes.oug lou: give us your last thought here.ith the >> mr. president, please, please we work with the businessyou' putti community. we want you to succeed. but you are puttingy animpedims in a way to make it impossible. we want you to succeed. work with us. >> i don't expect the republicans to love our budget. compromise is hard. we are going to have to compromise. lou: no spending cuts, what is the deal? that is tonight's "chalk talk" people really love snapshot from progressive, but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i wasaving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched to progressive. the better i drive, the more i save. i wish our company had something this cool. you're not filming this, are you? aw! camera sh
cuts which is the true source of the deficit problem along with anemic economic growth. and here's one. we just got confirmation that the latest fiscal numbers from the treasury department show the federal government ran up more red ink in october than it did the year before, and guess what? spending went up double digits from the year before. what a surprise. but the white house got one thing right today. it released a study showing that a massive year-end tax hike would kill consumer spending by $200 billion, right. so let's not raise taxes. and in addition to all of this, the joint chiefs of staff is apparently drawing up plans to keep 10,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan past the 2014 deadline. this break a president obama promise, but some promises are made to be broken, and i think this is probably a good move. but first up congress back at work tonight after the holiday recess with now just 35 days to go. are we any closer to a tax and fiscal cliff fix? cnbc's own chief washington correspondent john harwood joins us now with all the details. good evening, john. >> reporter: good ev
of that up, you are still going to be left with a huge hole called the deficit and it will have to mean cutting the federal budget. >> so, even if we increase the tax rates, as you noted, by the way, the top 1% in this country makes 17% of the income, and pay 37% of the taxes. i mean, so, the fair share argument really isn't -- >> up against a hard out here, and i'm going to ask you to give us your last thought here. >> mr. president, please, please, work with the business community. we want you to succeed. but, you are putting impediments in our way that make it impossible. we want you to succeed, we want to succeed. work with us. please work with us. >> andy puzder, thanks for being with us. european nations on the wrong side of the fiscal cliff but the president says america can steer clear. >> president barack obama: i believe it is solvable and my budget, frankly does it and i don't the republicans to adopt my budget, i recognize we have to compromise. compromise is hard. >> lou: more than a trillion-and-a-half dollars in tax hikes, no spending cuts. what is the deal? that is tonig
? >> well, first of all, i do believe the middle class has a stake and a good, solid balanced, deficit reduction plan. the plan should be what the president campaigned on, namely balance. that means we've got to have a substantial contribution from revenues. the revenues have to come from the folks who have been making good money during the recession. that's folks over $250,000 or some number close to. that the pentagon's got to make a contribution and if there is anything on healthcare, it's gotta be about reforming it, bringing the costs down, not cutting benefits. >> eliot: let's drill down a couple of pieces of this. what do you think the underlying ratio should be between cost cutting and revenue generation. last summer it was 10 to 1 in terms of cutting costs to revenue. thankfully the deal didn't get done. should it be one-to-one? where would you like to see this happen? >> you know, i actually don't know that number because i think the question is i think we need about a trillion and a half from revenues and the
, that is .5 percent of the deficit. we cannot get there, get the deficit down without significant cuts in spending. >>neil: the election has consequences and you could argue that a key premise of the president's re-election was i will raise taxes on the rich and he is likely entitled to that, he will likely see that but it is all the other things they are leveraging with democrats do not touch entitlements and putting everything on table it remind me of george bush sr. he agreed to reverse the pledge oh ride -- "read my lips, no new taxes." but the democrats never offered correspondenting spend cuts. we know what happened to him. what happens to those who agree do in the republican party? >>guest: the republican party has to stand for economic growth and it has to stand for the principle that keeping tax rates low and reforming the tax system is the way to grow the economy. i disagree slightly with rand paul. i am in favor of closing loopholes. i hate them. i call them termites in the tax system but we should use that money to credit a first-class world class tax system that stops expo
on the table a proposal that reduces the deficit by $4 trillion, that does so in a balanced way, that includes substantial cuts to discretionary non-defense spending, over $1 trillion, it includes revenue and includes $340 billion in savings from our health care entitlement programs. >> fairly unequivocal, isn't it? it's a mixture of pretty substantial spending cuts and tax increases. >> we haven't seen the plan. i haven't seen the plan. i don't think the speaker -- >> are you accusing the president of lying? is the president lying? >> where is the plan? >> is he lying? >> i don't think the plan's out there. i think jay carney might be but i don't see the plan. maybe they have a plan. >> jay carney is lying and he's the white house spokesman. >> no. >> they're lying, are they? >> i'm not saying that. piers, maybe they've got -- >> you just did. you just called him a liar. >> they haven't shared the plan with the american people. paul ryan and the republicans in congress have passed twice now and last year -- excuse me, two years ago as well, a ten year plan for a budget that deals with the ten
with the deficit and that will mean cutting the federal budget. >> eventh if increase the taxe rates, the top 1% maken timbersf 17 percent of the incoming and a 37% of the taxes. lou: give us your lasthot thought. >> mr. president, pleaseplease mr. president, please, workbusi with the bneusiness community. b we want you to work with us i but you put impediments in our way. work with us. please work with us. lou: european nations on the wrong side of the fiscal cliff but the president says ameritech and steer clear. >> i recognize we have to compromise. >> $1.5 trillion of tax hikes but no spending cuts? hikes but no spending cuts? "chalk talk."omcu core of my portfolio. hikes but no spending cuts? "chalk talk."omcu what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of yr portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possibl
term -- deficit reduction -- that is important to america's credibility. it is important for america's economy and economic growth. that plan has to be balanced, and that means significant revenues and that paying has to go around. that means the wealthy and well-off have to pay their fair share as well. these should not be new issues. they are ones that were debated. they came up in every debate -- even the foreign policy debate. the american people are on the side of the president and democrats who are making this case. that is not to say that there should not be spending as part as this debate. there has been over $1 trillion in spending cuts. that is a part of this debate that gets lost. just because washington has a short memory does not mean we should all have one and that there has already been sacrifice on behalf of the american people through those domestic discretionary cuts. we are excited. c.a.p. has been a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we have talked about medicare savings that can improve and strengthen the program and address rising national health expenditures. we
puts forward his plan. how is he going to close the other part of that deficit? you know, his proposal right now, the most he can say would raise would be about $68 billion when our deficit last year was $90 billion. what is the president's plan for closing the additional additional $1 trillion worth of deficit? i think that's incumbent on the president to put forward his plan. >> from your standpoint alone, there's no way you see fit in the coming 35 days that you would break that pledge with glove norquist. >> well, thomas, let's use a couple numbers here. even with this measly economic growth we've seen the last three years, revenue at the federal government has increased $344 billion per year. if we just return to a normal economy that returns about 18.5%, that would increase revenue an additional over $400 billion per year, that's $750 billion of revenue per year through economic growth. and the president, his proposal would raise 1/10 of that but would put at risk the economic growth and that $750 billion. so -- >> sir, with all due respect, though -- >> counterproductive. >> tha
rate will necessarily go up. we talk about debt and deficit in this chamber, if we remember less than 12 years ago, 12 years ago we hit a budgetary surplus of $258 billion. meaning that we were taking in $258 billion more in each year than we were spending. how was that possible? it was made possible by having created 22 million private sector jobs in the previous eight years. . what was the policy then? the policy was to invest in the american economy, in the american people, in education, in scientific research, and infrastructure. so i think the lessons from our most recent past are very instructive today as to what we should be doing in washington to promote growth. the gentleman from california spoke of a plan i was working on, that's a $1.2 trillion investment in rebuilding the roads and bridges of america. that plan, advanced by the new america foundation, would create 27 million private sector jobs in five years. the first year alone, over five million jobs which would reduce the current employment rate from where it is today to 6.4% and in the second year, 5.2%. now public in
it will reduce the deficit. not because it's good for the economy. he has a totally noneconomic reason for it and he's serious, we'll tell you what it is next. >> new at 10, warren buffett who has been begging the government to raise taxes on rich people like himself, well, instead of writing a check, he says, we should tax the rich because it will, quote, raise thh morale in the middle glass. he's serious. and all raising taxes on the wealthy may do, the big story of the day, president obama's campaign, holding more meetings on the fiscal cliff instead of real talks with politicians who have to decide this thing. and going on the road and selling the campaign harry reid says no cuts, democrats have cut spending and entitlements already. >> remember, we've already done more and billion dollars worth of cuts and we've already done that and we need to get credit for at that and these negotiations that take place. >> and the president's position, no more cuts, we're talking about it all with this company. sandra smith is here, and charles payne and as always on the floor of the new york
box and reduce the deficit, they spent it. he has no savings in his budget. he wants to count savings because he is not in iraq anymore. they threw him out. that is why he is not in iraq anymore. connell: we will obviously come back to this over and over again. grover norquist, thank you. dagen: we will stay on the topic of warren buffett and taxes. should the cut off the $500,000 not $250,000 as the president wants. would that ease some of the burden and pain of higher taxes? >> on one level it would, of course. raising that threshold from $250,000 to $500,000. the buffet idea maybe release a little bit of pain, but does nothing to address the extortions that he is talking about. huge distortions. 160,000 pages of distortions in the tax code. you were talking about a tiny, tiny improvement. i will take it, sure. we are getting distracted on this one. dagen: connell was talking about a minimum tax on the wealthy. he starts out $1 billion a year. 30%. a good idea in the abstract? then he starts talking about his brother in. those are multi billionaires, dude. >> i mean, i think these a
which means lowering tax rates not necessarily deficit reduction. it is the same policy romney had. it is where they were before the election. they gotta wake up and see the election, change things and they actually have to meet democrats somewhere in the middle. >> bill: i would hope. i would hope. new york times this morning, front page of the business section in terms of closing loopholes, romney was never specific about which one. new york times is saying that they know -- now we know one of the ones they're targeting. the headline is a tax break once sacred is now seen as vulnerable. what they're talking about is the mortgage interest deduction. there was no doubt it is on the table. it is one they're targeting rather than raise tax rates on the wealthy, they're going to either limit or get rid of the mortgage interest deduction. which is the most popular one. >> the most popular one. politically difficult i think. that's really the problem with romney's entire approach that said we'll just create revenue
that i think the democratic governing model is broken. we see with the debt and deficit -- the democratic party cannot go on this way. it is also going to have to accommodate itself to the physical reality, and i think that there is a lot the mainstream media that is focusing on republicans and tax rates. and what does the president have to do about spending? he's never been seous about cutting the deficit. is he really going to leave office with a 20 trillion-dollar debt? cheryl: if you look at this poll, and this is actually going to surprise you, when voters were asked, if the fiscal cliff heads, who do yo blame? obama. of course. 29%. >> that as president obama effectively we using the soap box. then i say this. if this was a referendum on higher tax rates, was a ballet on obamacare? the public is opposed to obamacare. is the president going to put obamacare on the table for spending cuts? they do have some principles to fight for and i think it would be a waste if they can act and caved in on everything. i think that the government needs more revenue. because of the recession, gover
to these problems and a recognition that a balanced approach to deficit reduction is the right approach. it's the one most beneficial for our economy. >> reporter: the president's trying to take advantage of that different tone. he talked to speaker boehner over the weekend by telephone. and today you've had two business leaders, john engler, tom donahue, in to meet with senior white house officials. they're trying to keep this going. aides on capitol hill tell me no substantive progress in negotiations just yet. they're just now getting back to work after thanksgiving. >> how does that make you feel about the market? does it make you feel like they have more kum-bi-ya going on in washington, d.c.? does it make you more willing to invest? >> i'll tell you what. i saw spielberg's "lincoln" over the weekend and it was incredible because it reminded me how nothing has changed on capitol hill. >> i agree with you 150%. >> in 150 years. >> don't you get tired of everybody saying, oh, washington is a mess right now. it's never been this bad. it's always been this bad. you see that in the movie. >
billion dollars this year, than it was in 2007. that's where the deficits are coming from. that's what should be talked about more than taxing people o are working their rear ends off to do better for themselves. >> i've got to tell you i don't like when warren buffett is brought into a discussion about people making $250,000. >> two different worlds. >> he's a very good business man. >> an amazing businessman, he doesn't car about taxes. >> he's not the only businessman saying it. >> it's not just the fiscal cliff coming on january 1st, more of the president's health care law is starting to kick l log on to foxnews.com. ♪ >> well, the election is over and the white house is putting out new rules for the health care law, one is telling how to reward workers for living a healthier life. so, ben, you know what? let's put aside the worry that this is going to drive up cost? isn't this more of the nancy state nonsense? >> big brother is watching you, big brother is watching you through the obama white house, through the department of health and human services and transmit that to the j
the government while dealing with the deficit. you have suggested something which coincidentally is called the buffett rule which i think, like lou gehrig's disease is very unbelievable that this rule would just happen to be promoted by -- >> the diseases were already taken. (laughter) (applause) >> jon: i assume bufferin has something to do with it. you have come out and said you would prefer something where the rich pay a flat -- at least 30%. on their money. why do you say that? >> well, if they make over a million, i say on the amount over a million they ought to pay at least 30% and over $10 million they ought to pay 35%. most of the people -- in fact, virtually all of the people in my office, 20 or so people, between payroll and income taxes they pay more than 30%. a number of the extremely wealthy people pay less than 15% and some pay less than 10% and some pay nothing. >> jon: this is because of capital gains and the cayman islands. >> the whole works. >> jon: and bags that are kept dangling. (laughter) >> you're getting warm. >> jon: exactly. what then about the argument where the
that his number one focus was jobs and the economy and also having a long-term plan to reduce the deficit in a balanced way and that means in addition to cuts you would also have revenue, revenue that you get by asking higher income earners to pay a little bit more to reduce the deficit and so the president was really clear in the campaign and i think it is really important that he take that discussion to the country now because he has said to the congress, the president said to the congress, just extend immediately all the middle class tax cuts and then we can decide what to do with folks at the higher end. again, it is important to understand the president has proposed that everybody get continued tax relief, existing tax rates, on the first $250,000 of family income, so he says let's extend that for everybody right now, but he believes we should ask higher income individuals to pay a little bit more. >> house majority leader eric cantor was on morning joe talking about the grover norquist tax pledge and whether he like other republicans would be willing to jump ship. here is his answer
. so the biggest problem created the deficit that we have, the fiscal cliff that we're falling over is on spending. so this preoccupation with talking about taxes is talking about the smaller of the two problems that are causing the deficit. >> right. when you have a negotiation that's going on although the moment, 72% of americans according to the cnn poll believe obama and the gop should compromise to get thing off a cliff. we have to give and we see the difference ideologically, but in all kinds of tixie deductions and so on and a flat income tax increase on wealthy americans. what's the ideological difference. wealthier people pay a little more tax. >> it's not a ideological difference. what can raise the money most efficiently and effectively to create economic growth that's going to create jobs for people. one of the things i talked about during the campaign was cutting the corporate tax for manufacturing. you want to create jobs that are here in america that are going to create good-paying jobs that create things that people will consume here in it country. let's do something
is deficit is the biggest problem. here we are with the cliff, the curve, whatever you want to call it and what do we find out? even republicans are warning they don't want to go over the cliff because guess what? just cutting the deficit without any regard to the rest of our priorities is a bad idea. it happens to be the heart of republican economic policy and the other thing about never raising taxes, guess what? we don't have the gdp to seniors ratio than we did 20 years ago, so if we're going to be serious about an ageing population, it means you can't stick to these fantasies. >> i remember two years ago on the show, introducing him to the audience and explaining he's the most powerful republican in government and i had to do this long thing on who he is. and now, here he is in the center of this debate. let's listen to what the republicans are up against in the negotiations with the white house. jay carney indicated today what the president's stance is on income tax rates. >> i would say also that the president has made clear that he will not sign a bill that extends the bush
the bush tax cuts for over $250,000 expire, $80 billion. deficit of $1 trillion a year. you are only 18% of the way. you are still missing 82% of the pie here. that is the number. >> dana: two minutes left, can i ask you one other thing. transparency. some on right try to push for negotiations to be in the public and broadcast on cspan. that is a terrible idea. >> brian: it is terrible idea. the only time they dealt with the sleeves up and working deals out, grant you, eric, you are right. the grand compromise. you talk about stimulus and obamacare and the auto bail-out they did it on their own. president was not engaged. he passed it along. i don't care what harry reid says. medicare and medicaid and social security have to be restructured, not fine tuned. obamacare has to be in play. >> eric: you don't want to see it on c-span? i do. >> andrea: you worked on the hill, i did. we worked in washington. the chances of it really happening on c-span would happen in the men's room and the hallways. call each other after the camera left the room. someone brought this idea to me and it's reall
% of the trillion dollars deficit why risk slowing down the economy, which a lot of people say might happen if you increase taxes why slow the economy for such a collectively small amount of money? >> first thought don't think it is a small amount of money. we need a balanced approach. david: uribe 2% of the deficit unfunded if you do that. >> to look at the president's budget, what he proposes is raising $1.6 trillion proposing spending cuts as well, combination of which would put us on a sustainable path in the economy in the long run. what we should avoid doing is having gridlock, not extending the middle-class tax cuts would wish on our report today is if the middle-class tax cuts are not extended that will cause consumer spending to fall by $200 billion next year. that'll be an awfully big hit to the economy. liz: to a for somebody economic council, physically says middle-class tax cuts on consumer spending, everybody spends. how do we come to this agreement, we keep hearing left the tax cuts they now warren buffett came out with an op-ed in "the new york times" say saying we should make that
with an incredible deficit deduction in place. >> i plan to wake up with a big hangover. >> if we would go ahead with sequestration and increase in tax rates, they have to be happy. where is santelli on this? >> he does wear a pin, santelli. it's a good question. >> look, i just think that it is true that january may not be a debacle. as someone that cares about -- let's put my cards on the table. higher stock prices. we ain't going to go in that direction. it's not good for the stock market. >> we hear it all the time from business leaders. i heard it yesterday. head of north american m&a. if you get me a deal, i as ceo am going to make significant decisions that i'm not making now. >> there it is. it's the decisions. it's the decision to hire. decision to invest. it's a little dicey. you don't know what the world is going to look like. i think that the guy i care about may be more than the people meeting with president is jpmorgan head of m&a. these are few and far between. i spoke to ceo of pbh after interview he said i want to make money for shareholders taking advantage of the fact that int
the plan to a bankruptcy judge on friday. sa they need to close a nearly $46 billion budget deficit. new york and new jersey need at least $71.3 billion to recover from the devastation of super storm sandy and prevent similar damage from future storms. this is according to the state's latest estimates. that total of course could grow. steve liesman has been crunching the newspaperup i numbers and hn the next hour. this is to try to build up some sort of protection, some massive floodwalls. governor cuomo was saying this would be like $9.1 billion to start building. >> questions about the future of the sec following mary shapiro's exit. elyse walter could run the agent until december 2013 when she would have to be renominated and reapproved by the senate. among the issues, and ongoing battle over regulating the $2.5 trillion money market fund industry, some 63 unfinished rule making requirements that are all part of dodd-frank and continuing fears of course about market stability and high frequency trading. p. >> money markets used to be covered by the fdic when the crisis first came on.
. in other words, instead of a cliff, that you reduce the deficit over time in a much more orderly fashion. >> with a plan, though. >> with a plan. exactly. bowles simpson was a plan. >> bowles simpson is so far gone at this point. >> but when you look at those, they all have some come by neigh of spending cuts and tax increases. the idea is that over a period of time, you basically put the country in a better path, the government in a better path to spending and taxation. what you don't want is the fiscal cliff because that was designed to be something that nobody liked. and the reason is, yes, you've reduced the deficit from about 7% of gdp down to about 4% of gdp, so you move in the right direction really dramatically, but you do it in a way that nobody was happy with exactly where those cuts come from and exactly how the taxes increase. >> with what you're seeing, and we never know, it's almost like a mating dance where you've got the male and a feel of some species -- >> it's an ugly one. >> looks like they're never going to do it. they get closer and closer. >> but there is a lot of
want to eliminate the deficit or the debt? >> it eliminates -- it does not eliminate the annual deficit. it keeps the debt as a percentage of g.d.p. constant. >> rose: and that's what we can live with in essence. >> we can live with it. the net debt is around 73% or something like that. that was 120% coming out of world war ii. and it will stay in the 70s, might even come down into the 60s, the 18.5% and 21% won't increase the ratio of debt-to-g.d.p. and it may very well bring it down slightly. >> rose: what has this meant to you? this friendship with warren buffett? >> it's been a wonderful friendship. can you imagine the chance to warren buffett about almost anything? to ask his opinion about every story you've ever had on your mind? it's -- it's priceless. and it's been price tlos go at this book and to see it all put down again, to add my introductions and to see how good fortune was at staying with this man as as -- as i say, we were standing by while warren buffett was becoming warren buffett and it was a remarkable thing that we were allowed to do and i loved it. >> rose: i'm sma
in new hampshire say i don't mind sharing some of the cost of dealing with our debt and deficits, but i want to feel like if i'm going to do that that it's going to be fair that everybody is going to be part of sharing in that burden. >> is there something for you, senator, that's an absolute nonstarter? >> well, i think we do need to take social security off the table. because social security has not contributed to the debt and the deficits. and so we do need to fix it for the long-term, but that's a different discussion than the one that we're having about those programs that are actually costing. so i think we do have to look at the cost of health care long-term because that's going to contribute to the debt. >> i also want to ask you about susan rice, she is meeting with senators mccain, graham, and ayott. do you think she has explaining to do with what she said about benghazi? and would you support her if she is nominated for secretary of state? >> she's not yet been nominated. so i'm going to look carefully at her credentials, which i think qualify her very well to be nominated. i
it was in 2007. that's where the deficits are coming from. that's what should be talked about more than taxing people who are working their rear ends off t do better for hemselves. >> i've got to tell you i don't like when warren buffett is brought into a discussion about people making $250,000. >> two different worlds. >> he's a very good business man. >> an amazing businessman, he doesn't care about xes. >> he's not the only businessman saying it. >> it's not just the fiscal cliff coming on january 1st, more of the president's health more of the president's health care law is starting to kick [ malannouncer ] it'that time of year again. time for cii price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. ♪ [ male anno
norquist in july when he agreed to a tax increases in exchange for a grand bargain on the deficit. the other republicaa gang member, senator mike ray powell reportedly indicated earlier that he is open to a range of possible tax rates. now senate is lindsay gramm, john mccain, bob barker along with house majority leader eric cantor and congressman peter king are rebuking the norquist anti-tax pledge, a new gang of six saying in recent days they would break that pledge to look for new ways to generate revenue republican congressman peter king said bluntly, he is not ruling anything out. >> i agree entirely. a pledge to sign 20 years ago, 18 years ago. i think everything should be on the table. lou: two of the senator's not only reversing themselves on raising taxes but also rethinking their opposition to a susan rice secretary of state apartment. senators gramm and mccain both revising their political positions in a bit -- at a breathtaking pace. joining a summer we are calling the republican reset, the fiscal cliff, of course, and the coup in egypt, the president seemingly in sear
dick durbin says medicare and medicaid are fair game in deficit negotiations, but insist social security should be left alone. >> social security does not add one penny to our debt, not a penny. it's a separate funded operation, and we can do things, and i believe we should now, smaller things, played out over the long term that gives it solvency. medicare is another story. only 12 years of solvency lie ahead if we do nothing. so those who say don't touch it, don't change it are ignoring the obvious. >> despite showing willingness for reform -- >> can we talk about that for a second? >> i don't want to repeat what you said. >> it's bull hockey. >> that's not what you said. >> this whole thing has been a complete farce for years. there's no trust fund. they raided that a long time ago. but the bigger point, i will because you know what? my heart has grown like the grinch's since thanksgiving. i have so much to be thankful for. >> it's been growing ever since election day, basically. >> so i'm going to be kind. first of all, senator durbin deserves respect on this front because he
clinton, the secretary of state, to get up there and by this time we have attention deficit disorder so i am worried this will fade away like other important issues that end up on the hills supposedly, under investigation. >>neil: but there are a number of folks who think if the administration were to push miss rice forward for secretary of state, it would be inviting acrimony but it would come at an enormous cost. do you grow? >>guest: i do, but what we are seeing is a weird school yard battle. the fact that senators john mccain and graham confronted the president and the president came out and publicly defended we ambassador rice, now you are getting in this weird shoving match where, perhaps, the president feels, as a matter of pride, he will put her forward. she is very smart person, very experienced individual, and the misstep on benghazi, on going out on the public and the sunday morning talk shows five days after the fact and claiming she narrative of the video and the spontaneous protests, she relied purely on the intelligence talking points defies belief so that part needs to be
house for another deficit meeting. instead, the president is hosting small business leaders, ceos, and heading to philadelphia to sell his position on taxes. a spokesman for the house speaker says the president should be focusing on congressional democrats who republicans they refuse to offer necessary spending cuts. other republicans said democrats are simply continuing election season. >> this seems like our friend on the other side are having difficulty turning off the campaign. we need to sit down and work this matter out. >> we are all here, this administration and those who have been elected to congress, to erve the iraqi people. to suggest that we should, now that the election is over, stop talking to them about these vital issues i think is bad advice. >> republicans also planted a little campaigning themselves. house republicans we will visit local small-business is to emphasize that threat to jobs posed by congressional democrats small business tax hike. gerri: thank you for that. we will watch out for those naked people on the hill. >> reporter: that's right. be carefu
large deficits, as well. so the politics in spain slightly skewed as they will be, but not so much pressure on rajoy at the moment. unlikely to ask for assistance in the short term. we also have another euro group meeting take, back in brussels, yes, i know, we seem to have one every week. they may come up with a long term financing deal for greece. finally talking about debt forgiveness in greece which is what we all know has got to happen. whether it can happen before the german elections in the fall next year is a mute point. anyway, that's where we stand. fairly down beat for equities and yields a little bit mixed. back to you. >> all right. thank you very much. let's get back to the fiscal cliff. we've been talking about the issues of taxes. as we mentioned, warren buffett calling for a minimum tax for the wealthy. he starts with suppose that an investor you admire and trust comes to you with an investment idea. this is a good one, he says, i'm in it and i think you should be, too. would your reply possibility be it all depends on what my tax rate will be on the gain you're sa
, here's a fact. the president has on the table a proposal that reduces the deficit by $4 trillion. that is substance. so he has not waited for people to start smelling the jet fumes at national airport. he has actively put forward a plan. >> okay. welcome back to "morning joe." welcome back. christmas is coming. >> all right. >> can you believe it? >> yeah, the christmas tree. it's looking beautiful. harold ford jr. is still with us and co-founder of the no labels organization, market mckinnon, also with us, "fortune" magazine's leigh gallagher. mark, good to see you. jeff zucker. >> a struggling -- >> taking over cnn. >> looking to jz. >> jeff zucker to run the joint. >> that would be interesting. >> smart guy if see what happens. all right. well, good, good. so how is our republican party -- so mark mckinnon, it's been a very, very rough month for you as a republican. you haven't shaved since the election. >> ah. >> you're not -- >> looking very handsome. >> you're not brushing your hair. >> well. >> your scarves look a little out of touch with the rest of your outfit like this
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